How to Make Sure Your Kids Stay Safe This Halloween

Children dressed as witches for Halloween

Sure, we may pretend Halloween is supposed to be a scary night, but as parents, we don’t actually want it to be. Our children’s holidays should be fun, comfortable and free of danger. Your local personal injury attorney at Peter Davis Law wants you and your family to be as safe as possible this Halloween by following these easy safety tips.

1.    Be Careful with Your Candy

Tell your kids not to eat their candy until you’re all safely at home and you’ve been able to inspect it. A good way to ensure they don’t break this rule is by feeding them right before you leave, or bringing a couple pieces of your own candy for them to snack on as they travel the neighborhood.

If you notice that candy looks like it might have been tampered with in any way—a loose wrapper or a pinhole in the wrapper—be safe and throw it away. Chances are, your kid has so much loot, he or she won’t miss it.

Also avoid homemade treats from people you don’t know and trust. They might be tempting, and chances are they are nothing to be afraid of, but there’s no way to say for certain what’s inside of them. If you suspect someone may have been tampered with your children’s sweets, call the cops or Poison Control immediately.

2.    Wear Safe Costumes

Avoid masks that might obstruct your child’s vision. No matter how much he or she loves the mask, it’s not worth an injury from tripping. Prioritize the comfort of your child’s Halloween costume. Chances are, they won’t have as much fun if they are in an itchy, tight outfit that makes it difficult for them to trick-or-treat.

When it comes to face paint, make sure you only use costume makeup. And, make sure you follow the directions on the makeup’s packaging. Avoid putting makeup near the eyes, and wash it off entirely as soon as you get home. If you notice any sort of rash on your child, remove the makeup immediately.

3.    Put Reflective Material on Your Kids’ Costumes

Walking on streets in the night as you and your children trick-or-treat can be dangerous. Make sure your kids are visible to drivers by attaching reflective material to their costumes.  

Additionally, have your kids carry flashlights. Not only will this alert vehicles that there is someone walking on the road, it will also make it easier for your family to navigate dark neighborhoods and yards.

4.    Avoid Trick-Or-Treating in the Dark

Another alternative to consider is avoiding trick-or-treating when it gets dark. Start earlier in the evening, before the sun goes down, so it’s easier to be seen and keep track of your group. Or, throw a Halloween party at your house instead. Have the whole family help make snacks, set up games and decorate your home. Invite friends over for a super safe and comfortable holiday evening.

5.    Review Fire Safety

Make sure costumes are flame resistant, and remind your children to steer clear of lit candles. When lighting up jack-o-lanterns, review fire safety rules. Recite “stop, drop and roll” to make sure your children are prepared for an emergency.

If Your Child is Injured, Talk to a Personal Injury Attorney

If anyone in your family is injured on Halloween while visiting a home or walking on the street, talk to a personal injury attorney. A personal injury attorney at Peter Davis Law will make sure you and your family receive the treatment you deserve.